News Articles > Foreign and Military Policy and Alternatives

Nation of Change, June 7th, 2014: Wars fulfill multiple functions for the U.S. elite.  They justify vast expenditures that benefit the political clients of the president.  They throw tax-payer money to a small group of arms manufacturers.  They can revive faded fortunes.  Continue Reading…

WBUR-FM, September 6th, 2013: Even short conflicts have long term costs….The U.S. lacks the basic accounting systems necessary to understand and analyze where and how money is spent….The economic lessons from 12 years in Iraq and Afghanistan are that we underestimated the costs, borrowed all the money to pay for them, and failed to account for where it was all spent. Continue Reading…

Financial Times, January 23, 2013:  , the eventual costs of caring for veterans of the Afghanistan war will exceed $1tn. To put these numbers into perspective, the debate surrounding the fiscal cliff has centred on expenditure cuts over 10 years of $1tn-$2tn. Continue Reading…

On March 7, 24 senators urged President Obama to bring American combat forces home from  Afghanistan. The bipartisan group said the wars in Iraq  and Afghanistan could have rebuilt the interstate highway system five times over. See their letter here.

Armed Forces Journal, February 2012: I spent last year in Afghanistan…. I witnessed the absence of success on virtually every level. Continue Reading and see New York Times article.

Huffington Post, September 29th, 2011: If  we’re going to use the money to kill, imprison, and otherwise oppress people  in other countries who have done us no wrong, I would just as soon let Warren  Buffett keep his money. Continue Reading…

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, September 8th,2011: We could pull every last soldier out of Iraq and Afghanistan tomorrow, but the costs of caring for them will keep climbing until at least 2040…. the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have so far cost the American taxpayer a whopping $3.2 trillion…. the United States will spend another $800 billion in war interest by 2020. [And since military jobs cost more to create,] If we estimate that the Pentagon spent $130 billion a year directly on the wars, that money, if spent at home instead, would have created 900,000 US jobs in education or 780,000 US jobs in health care. Continue Reading….

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is desperate for emergency funding to meet the urgent needs of families and communities devastated by the storm, many of which are still without power or even under water. Rather than simply approving the funding “off-budget” – which is what Congress traditionally does in such situations – House GOP members are holding FEMA hostage, saying that the $3.6 billion in emergency storm relief funding must be offset by cuts in other federal programs.

If they’re looking for ways to offset FEMA disaster relief funding, here’s a good place to start: this year’s spending on the Iraq War ($47.4 billion) alone would pay for all the public disaster funding that FEMA disbursed from Fiscal Year 1999 through Fiscal Year 2010.

October 7, 2011 will mark ten years since the beginning of the U.S. war in Afghanistan. With this in mind, NPP has released new numbers, analyses and tools about the costs of a decade at war.  You can find a host of new information here.

This Can’t Be Happening, August 13th, 2011: What is the most powerful nation in the world with the largest, most expensive, most lethal military in the history of mankind to do when the good times turn bad, the money goes funny and class warfare breaks out on the homefront?….Special Operations, which includes Special Forces, Seals and a host of other lethal military forces that emphasize mobility, efficiency, secrecy and unaccountability. Continue Reading…

U.S. Defense Industry Preventing Effective Strategies in Afghanistan

Huffington Post, September 28th, 2010

Pentagon’s strategy often reflects the financial interests of the defense industry….Big-ticket items are where the money is, irrespective of what is effective in undermining threats. Continue Reading…

 



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